Ortiz vs Wilder

Deontay Wilder vs Luis Ortiz 2 Fight Odds, Time, Date, Live Stream and TV InfoDeontay Wilder and Tyson Fury have been on a collision course ever since their thrilling first fight ended in a draw in December 2018. The heavyweights decided to each take two interim fights ahead of their rematch, reportedly penciled in for Feb. 22.

Click Hare To Watch Now Live

While Fury played it safe by lining up Tom Schwarz and Otto Wallin (the latter turned out to be more difficult than anyone imagined), Wilder (41-0-1, 40 KOs) is taking a significant risk with a rematch against Luis Ortiz (31-1, 26 KOs) on Saturday in Las Vegas.

In their first bout back in March 2018, Ortiz came achingly close to stopping Wilder in a furious seventh round at the Barclay’s Center in New York. The big Cuban was unable to close the deal, and Wilder bounced back by knocking out Ortiz with a vicious uppercut in the 10th frame.

Wilder must be confident he has Ortiz, a top-10 heavyweight, all figured out, because he’s risking losing his WBC world title three months before a megafight with Fury, considered by many to be the division’s lineal champion. A loss would greatly dampen the enthusiasm for that bout and might force promoters to reschedule it so Wilder can try to get his belt back.

Deontay Wilder vs Luis Ortiz 2 Live Stream Free Signup

Ortiz, 40, should be laser-focused for this fight. It likely represents his last chance to make history by becoming the first Cuban to win a heavyweight world title.

Saturday’s pay-per-view card also features Leo Santa Cruz taking on Miguel Flores for the vacant WBA super featherweight world title. Santa Cruz has long dominated the featherweight ranks and will now be making his debut at 130 pounds.

There are plenty of reasons to expect Saturday’s fight won’t last a full 12 rounds. For one, both fighters insist they are going to end the night early. Wilder, well aware of how close he came to defeat in the first fight, seems intent on finishing off Ortiz as quickly as possible.

“He has to be perfect for 12 rounds. I only have to be perfect for two seconds and—bam, baby, good night,” he said, per ESPN.com’s Dan Rafael.

Wilder’s right hand is the most lethal in the sport, a weapon so potent that the 34-year-old has been able to reach the pinnacle of the sport without having to develop a deep repertoire of combinations or perfect his technique.

A pawing jab followed by a right cross is elementary stuff, but that’s all it takes with Wilder on most nights. His right hand detonated on Dominic Breazeale in the first round of their fight in May, sending the 6’7″ colossus crumbling to the mat like a skyscraper mid-demolition. Wilder believes Ortiz won’t be able to survive much longer.

It’s a typical boast, but you get the sense Wilder is right; Ortiz does need to be perfect on Saturday. As a southpaw, Ortiz has to be careful about opening up lanes for the orthodox Wilder to send his right hand. His defense has to be impeccable while he looks to score points and go for the KO himself.

“This is not going 12 rounds,” Ortiz told Rafael through an interpreter. “Either he knocks me out or I knock him out, and I wish there was no bell between rounds so we could just keep going.”

Bermane Stiverne and Fury are the only two boxers to go a full 12 frames with Wilder. Fury managed to avoid Wilder’s payoff punch until the last round, and a miraculous recovery from the knockdown allowed him to salvage a draw. Ortiz is much older and not nearly as slick defensively as Fury. It’s unlikely he can avoid punishment for a full 36 minutes.

According to CBS Sports’ Brian Campbell, Ortiz blames his loss to Wilder on bad cardio, which left him unable to finish the job when he had Wilder dazed in the seventh round. Campbell has noted Ortiz is now cutting a slimmer figure, hoping better stamina can propel him to victory this time around. However, being in better shape won’t mean much if old age has quietly eroded his sharpness and reflexes. Every second Ortiz is in range of Wilder’s right hands means he’s in mortal danger, and a single mistake could land him in the hospital.

Ortiz has won three fights since losing to Wilder, the most recent a 12-round, unanimous decision over Christian Hammer in March. He’s done everything he can to set up a last shot at championship glory. Wilder is boxing’s most dangerous puncher, and he has plenty riding on this match. Ortiz may have learned his lesson from the first fight, but if Wilder has answered his own riddles in the interim, he should be able to reach a similar outcome on Saturday.

Ortiz vs Wilder 2

Deontay Wilder vs Luis Ortiz 2 Fight Odds, Time, Date, Live Stream and TV InfoDeontay Wilder and Tyson Fury have been on a collision course ever since their thrilling first fight ended in a draw in December 2018. The heavyweights decided to each take two interim fights ahead of their rematch, reportedly penciled in for Feb. 22.

Click Hare To Watch Now Live

While Fury played it safe by lining up Tom Schwarz and Otto Wallin (the latter turned out to be more difficult than anyone imagined), Wilder (41-0-1, 40 KOs) is taking a significant risk with a rematch against Luis Ortiz (31-1, 26 KOs) on Saturday in Las Vegas.

In their first bout back in March 2018, Ortiz came achingly close to stopping Wilder in a furious seventh round at the Barclay’s Center in New York. The big Cuban was unable to close the deal, and Wilder bounced back by knocking out Ortiz with a vicious uppercut in the 10th frame.

Wilder must be confident he has Ortiz, a top-10 heavyweight, all figured out, because he’s risking losing his WBC world title three months before a megafight with Fury, considered by many to be the division’s lineal champion. A loss would greatly dampen the enthusiasm for that bout and might force promoters to reschedule it so Wilder can try to get his belt back.

Deontay Wilder vs Luis Ortiz 2 Live Stream Free Signup

Ortiz, 40, should be laser-focused for this fight. It likely represents his last chance to make history by becoming the first Cuban to win a heavyweight world title.

Saturday’s pay-per-view card also features Leo Santa Cruz taking on Miguel Flores for the vacant WBA super featherweight world title. Santa Cruz has long dominated the featherweight ranks and will now be making his debut at 130 pounds.

There are plenty of reasons to expect Saturday’s fight won’t last a full 12 rounds. For one, both fighters insist they are going to end the night early. Wilder, well aware of how close he came to defeat in the first fight, seems intent on finishing off Ortiz as quickly as possible.

“He has to be perfect for 12 rounds. I only have to be perfect for two seconds and—bam, baby, good night,” he said, per ESPN.com’s Dan Rafael.

Wilder’s right hand is the most lethal in the sport, a weapon so potent that the 34-year-old has been able to reach the pinnacle of the sport without having to develop a deep repertoire of combinations or perfect his technique.

A pawing jab followed by a right cross is elementary stuff, but that’s all it takes with Wilder on most nights. His right hand detonated on Dominic Breazeale in the first round of their fight in May, sending the 6’7″ colossus crumbling to the mat like a skyscraper mid-demolition. Wilder believes Ortiz won’t be able to survive much longer.

It’s a typical boast, but you get the sense Wilder is right; Ortiz does need to be perfect on Saturday. As a southpaw, Ortiz has to be careful about opening up lanes for the orthodox Wilder to send his right hand. His defense has to be impeccable while he looks to score points and go for the KO himself.

“This is not going 12 rounds,” Ortiz told Rafael through an interpreter. “Either he knocks me out or I knock him out, and I wish there was no bell between rounds so we could just keep going.”

Bermane Stiverne and Fury are the only two boxers to go a full 12 frames with Wilder. Fury managed to avoid Wilder’s payoff punch until the last round, and a miraculous recovery from the knockdown allowed him to salvage a draw. Ortiz is much older and not nearly as slick defensively as Fury. It’s unlikely he can avoid punishment for a full 36 minutes.

According to CBS Sports’ Brian Campbell, Ortiz blames his loss to Wilder on bad cardio, which left him unable to finish the job when he had Wilder dazed in the seventh round. Campbell has noted Ortiz is now cutting a slimmer figure, hoping better stamina can propel him to victory this time around. However, being in better shape won’t mean much if old age has quietly eroded his sharpness and reflexes. Every second Ortiz is in range of Wilder’s right hands means he’s in mortal danger, and a single mistake could land him in the hospital.

Ortiz has won three fights since losing to Wilder, the most recent a 12-round, unanimous decision over Christian Hammer in March. He’s done everything he can to set up a last shot at championship glory. Wilder is boxing’s most dangerous puncher, and he has plenty riding on this match. Ortiz may have learned his lesson from the first fight, but if Wilder has answered his own riddles in the interim, he should be able to reach a similar outcome on Saturday.

Wilder vs Ortiz

Deontay Wilder vs Luis Ortiz 2 Fight Odds, Time, Date, Live Stream and TV InfoDeontay Wilder and Tyson Fury have been on a collision course ever since their thrilling first fight ended in a draw in December 2018. The heavyweights decided to each take two interim fights ahead of their rematch, reportedly penciled in for Feb. 22.

Click Hare To Watch Now Live

While Fury played it safe by lining up Tom Schwarz and Otto Wallin (the latter turned out to be more difficult than anyone imagined), Wilder (41-0-1, 40 KOs) is taking a significant risk with a rematch against Luis Ortiz (31-1, 26 KOs) on Saturday in Las Vegas.

In their first bout back in March 2018, Ortiz came achingly close to stopping Wilder in a furious seventh round at the Barclay’s Center in New York. The big Cuban was unable to close the deal, and Wilder bounced back by knocking out Ortiz with a vicious uppercut in the 10th frame.

Wilder must be confident he has Ortiz, a top-10 heavyweight, all figured out, because he’s risking losing his WBC world title three months before a megafight with Fury, considered by many to be the division’s lineal champion. A loss would greatly dampen the enthusiasm for that bout and might force promoters to reschedule it so Wilder can try to get his belt back.

Deontay Wilder vs Luis Ortiz 2 Live Stream Free Signup

Ortiz, 40, should be laser-focused for this fight. It likely represents his last chance to make history by becoming the first Cuban to win a heavyweight world title.

Saturday’s pay-per-view card also features Leo Santa Cruz taking on Miguel Flores for the vacant WBA super featherweight world title. Santa Cruz has long dominated the featherweight ranks and will now be making his debut at 130 pounds.

There are plenty of reasons to expect Saturday’s fight won’t last a full 12 rounds. For one, both fighters insist they are going to end the night early. Wilder, well aware of how close he came to defeat in the first fight, seems intent on finishing off Ortiz as quickly as possible.

“He has to be perfect for 12 rounds. I only have to be perfect for two seconds and—bam, baby, good night,” he said, per ESPN.com’s Dan Rafael.

Wilder’s right hand is the most lethal in the sport, a weapon so potent that the 34-year-old has been able to reach the pinnacle of the sport without having to develop a deep repertoire of combinations or perfect his technique.

A pawing jab followed by a right cross is elementary stuff, but that’s all it takes with Wilder on most nights. His right hand detonated on Dominic Breazeale in the first round of their fight in May, sending the 6’7″ colossus crumbling to the mat like a skyscraper mid-demolition. Wilder believes Ortiz won’t be able to survive much longer.

It’s a typical boast, but you get the sense Wilder is right; Ortiz does need to be perfect on Saturday. As a southpaw, Ortiz has to be careful about opening up lanes for the orthodox Wilder to send his right hand. His defense has to be impeccable while he looks to score points and go for the KO himself.

“This is not going 12 rounds,” Ortiz told Rafael through an interpreter. “Either he knocks me out or I knock him out, and I wish there was no bell between rounds so we could just keep going.”

Bermane Stiverne and Fury are the only two boxers to go a full 12 frames with Wilder. Fury managed to avoid Wilder’s payoff punch until the last round, and a miraculous recovery from the knockdown allowed him to salvage a draw. Ortiz is much older and not nearly as slick defensively as Fury. It’s unlikely he can avoid punishment for a full 36 minutes.

According to CBS Sports’ Brian Campbell, Ortiz blames his loss to Wilder on bad cardio, which left him unable to finish the job when he had Wilder dazed in the seventh round. Campbell has noted Ortiz is now cutting a slimmer figure, hoping better stamina can propel him to victory this time around. However, being in better shape won’t mean much if old age has quietly eroded his sharpness and reflexes. Every second Ortiz is in range of Wilder’s right hands means he’s in mortal danger, and a single mistake could land him in the hospital.

Ortiz has won three fights since losing to Wilder, the most recent a 12-round, unanimous decision over Christian Hammer in March. He’s done everything he can to set up a last shot at championship glory. Wilder is boxing’s most dangerous puncher, and he has plenty riding on this match. Ortiz may have learned his lesson from the first fight, but if Wilder has answered his own riddles in the interim, he should be able to reach a similar outcome on Saturday.

Wilder vs Ortiz 2

Deontay Wilder vs Luis Ortiz 2 Fight Odds, Time, Date, Live Stream and TV InfoDeontay Wilder and Tyson Fury have been on a collision course ever since their thrilling first fight ended in a draw in December 2018. The heavyweights decided to each take two interim fights ahead of their rematch, reportedly penciled in for Feb. 22.

Click Hare To Watch Now Live

While Fury played it safe by lining up Tom Schwarz and Otto Wallin (the latter turned out to be more difficult than anyone imagined), Wilder (41-0-1, 40 KOs) is taking a significant risk with a rematch against Luis Ortiz (31-1, 26 KOs) on Saturday in Las Vegas.

In their first bout back in March 2018, Ortiz came achingly close to stopping Wilder in a furious seventh round at the Barclay’s Center in New York. The big Cuban was unable to close the deal, and Wilder bounced back by knocking out Ortiz with a vicious uppercut in the 10th frame.

Wilder must be confident he has Ortiz, a top-10 heavyweight, all figured out, because he’s risking losing his WBC world title three months before a megafight with Fury, considered by many to be the division’s lineal champion. A loss would greatly dampen the enthusiasm for that bout and might force promoters to reschedule it so Wilder can try to get his belt back.

Deontay Wilder vs Luis Ortiz 2 Live Stream Free Signup

Ortiz, 40, should be laser-focused for this fight. It likely represents his last chance to make history by becoming the first Cuban to win a heavyweight world title.

Saturday’s pay-per-view card also features Leo Santa Cruz taking on Miguel Flores for the vacant WBA super featherweight world title. Santa Cruz has long dominated the featherweight ranks and will now be making his debut at 130 pounds.

There are plenty of reasons to expect Saturday’s fight won’t last a full 12 rounds. For one, both fighters insist they are going to end the night early. Wilder, well aware of how close he came to defeat in the first fight, seems intent on finishing off Ortiz as quickly as possible.

“He has to be perfect for 12 rounds. I only have to be perfect for two seconds and—bam, baby, good night,” he said, per ESPN.com’s Dan Rafael.

Wilder’s right hand is the most lethal in the sport, a weapon so potent that the 34-year-old has been able to reach the pinnacle of the sport without having to develop a deep repertoire of combinations or perfect his technique.

A pawing jab followed by a right cross is elementary stuff, but that’s all it takes with Wilder on most nights. His right hand detonated on Dominic Breazeale in the first round of their fight in May, sending the 6’7″ colossus crumbling to the mat like a skyscraper mid-demolition. Wilder believes Ortiz won’t be able to survive much longer.

It’s a typical boast, but you get the sense Wilder is right; Ortiz does need to be perfect on Saturday. As a southpaw, Ortiz has to be careful about opening up lanes for the orthodox Wilder to send his right hand. His defense has to be impeccable while he looks to score points and go for the KO himself.

“This is not going 12 rounds,” Ortiz told Rafael through an interpreter. “Either he knocks me out or I knock him out, and I wish there was no bell between rounds so we could just keep going.”

Bermane Stiverne and Fury are the only two boxers to go a full 12 frames with Wilder. Fury managed to avoid Wilder’s payoff punch until the last round, and a miraculous recovery from the knockdown allowed him to salvage a draw. Ortiz is much older and not nearly as slick defensively as Fury. It’s unlikely he can avoid punishment for a full 36 minutes.

According to CBS Sports’ Brian Campbell, Ortiz blames his loss to Wilder on bad cardio, which left him unable to finish the job when he had Wilder dazed in the seventh round. Campbell has noted Ortiz is now cutting a slimmer figure, hoping better stamina can propel him to victory this time around. However, being in better shape won’t mean much if old age has quietly eroded his sharpness and reflexes. Every second Ortiz is in range of Wilder’s right hands means he’s in mortal danger, and a single mistake could land him in the hospital.

Ortiz has won three fights since losing to Wilder, the most recent a 12-round, unanimous decision over Christian Hammer in March. He’s done everything he can to set up a last shot at championship glory. Wilder is boxing’s most dangerous puncher, and he has plenty riding on this match. Ortiz may have learned his lesson from the first fight, but if Wilder has answered his own riddles in the interim, he should be able to reach a similar outcome on Saturday.

Luis Ortiz vs Deontay Wilder 2

Deontay Wilder vs Luis Ortiz 2 Fight Odds, Time, Date, Live Stream and TV InfoDeontay Wilder and Tyson Fury have been on a collision course ever since their thrilling first fight ended in a draw in December 2018. The heavyweights decided to each take two interim fights ahead of their rematch, reportedly penciled in for Feb. 22.

Click Hare To Watch Now Live

While Fury played it safe by lining up Tom Schwarz and Otto Wallin (the latter turned out to be more difficult than anyone imagined), Wilder (41-0-1, 40 KOs) is taking a significant risk with a rematch against Luis Ortiz (31-1, 26 KOs) on Saturday in Las Vegas.

In their first bout back in March 2018, Ortiz came achingly close to stopping Wilder in a furious seventh round at the Barclay’s Center in New York. The big Cuban was unable to close the deal, and Wilder bounced back by knocking out Ortiz with a vicious uppercut in the 10th frame.

Wilder must be confident he has Ortiz, a top-10 heavyweight, all figured out, because he’s risking losing his WBC world title three months before a megafight with Fury, considered by many to be the division’s lineal champion. A loss would greatly dampen the enthusiasm for that bout and might force promoters to reschedule it so Wilder can try to get his belt back.

Deontay Wilder vs Luis Ortiz 2 Live Stream Free Signup

Ortiz, 40, should be laser-focused for this fight. It likely represents his last chance to make history by becoming the first Cuban to win a heavyweight world title.

Saturday’s pay-per-view card also features Leo Santa Cruz taking on Miguel Flores for the vacant WBA super featherweight world title. Santa Cruz has long dominated the featherweight ranks and will now be making his debut at 130 pounds.

There are plenty of reasons to expect Saturday’s fight won’t last a full 12 rounds. For one, both fighters insist they are going to end the night early. Wilder, well aware of how close he came to defeat in the first fight, seems intent on finishing off Ortiz as quickly as possible.

“He has to be perfect for 12 rounds. I only have to be perfect for two seconds and—bam, baby, good night,” he said, per ESPN.com’s Dan Rafael.

Wilder’s right hand is the most lethal in the sport, a weapon so potent that the 34-year-old has been able to reach the pinnacle of the sport without having to develop a deep repertoire of combinations or perfect his technique.

A pawing jab followed by a right cross is elementary stuff, but that’s all it takes with Wilder on most nights. His right hand detonated on Dominic Breazeale in the first round of their fight in May, sending the 6’7″ colossus crumbling to the mat like a skyscraper mid-demolition. Wilder believes Ortiz won’t be able to survive much longer.

It’s a typical boast, but you get the sense Wilder is right; Ortiz does need to be perfect on Saturday. As a southpaw, Ortiz has to be careful about opening up lanes for the orthodox Wilder to send his right hand. His defense has to be impeccable while he looks to score points and go for the KO himself.

“This is not going 12 rounds,” Ortiz told Rafael through an interpreter. “Either he knocks me out or I knock him out, and I wish there was no bell between rounds so we could just keep going.”

Bermane Stiverne and Fury are the only two boxers to go a full 12 frames with Wilder. Fury managed to avoid Wilder’s payoff punch until the last round, and a miraculous recovery from the knockdown allowed him to salvage a draw. Ortiz is much older and not nearly as slick defensively as Fury. It’s unlikely he can avoid punishment for a full 36 minutes.

According to CBS Sports’ Brian Campbell, Ortiz blames his loss to Wilder on bad cardio, which left him unable to finish the job when he had Wilder dazed in the seventh round. Campbell has noted Ortiz is now cutting a slimmer figure, hoping better stamina can propel him to victory this time around. However, being in better shape won’t mean much if old age has quietly eroded his sharpness and reflexes. Every second Ortiz is in range of Wilder’s right hands means he’s in mortal danger, and a single mistake could land him in the hospital.

Ortiz has won three fights since losing to Wilder, the most recent a 12-round, unanimous decision over Christian Hammer in March. He’s done everything he can to set up a last shot at championship glory. Wilder is boxing’s most dangerous puncher, and he has plenty riding on this match. Ortiz may have learned his lesson from the first fight, but if Wilder has answered his own riddles in the interim, he should be able to reach a similar outcome on Saturday.

Deontay Wilder vs Luis Ortiz 2

Deontay Wilder vs Luis Ortiz 2 Fight Odds, Time, Date, Live Stream and TV InfoDeontay Wilder and Tyson Fury have been on a collision course ever since their thrilling first fight ended in a draw in December 2018. The heavyweights decided to each take two interim fights ahead of their rematch, reportedly penciled in for Feb. 22.

Click Hare To Watch Now Live

While Fury played it safe by lining up Tom Schwarz and Otto Wallin (the latter turned out to be more difficult than anyone imagined), Wilder (41-0-1, 40 KOs) is taking a significant risk with a rematch against Luis Ortiz (31-1, 26 KOs) on Saturday in Las Vegas.

In their first bout back in March 2018, Ortiz came achingly close to stopping Wilder in a furious seventh round at the Barclay’s Center in New York. The big Cuban was unable to close the deal, and Wilder bounced back by knocking out Ortiz with a vicious uppercut in the 10th frame.

Wilder must be confident he has Ortiz, a top-10 heavyweight, all figured out, because he’s risking losing his WBC world title three months before a megafight with Fury, considered by many to be the division’s lineal champion. A loss would greatly dampen the enthusiasm for that bout and might force promoters to reschedule it so Wilder can try to get his belt back.

Deontay Wilder vs Luis Ortiz 2 Live Stream Free Signup

Ortiz, 40, should be laser-focused for this fight. It likely represents his last chance to make history by becoming the first Cuban to win a heavyweight world title.

Saturday’s pay-per-view card also features Leo Santa Cruz taking on Miguel Flores for the vacant WBA super featherweight world title. Santa Cruz has long dominated the featherweight ranks and will now be making his debut at 130 pounds.

There are plenty of reasons to expect Saturday’s fight won’t last a full 12 rounds. For one, both fighters insist they are going to end the night early. Wilder, well aware of how close he came to defeat in the first fight, seems intent on finishing off Ortiz as quickly as possible.

“He has to be perfect for 12 rounds. I only have to be perfect for two seconds and—bam, baby, good night,” he said, per ESPN.com’s Dan Rafael.

Wilder’s right hand is the most lethal in the sport, a weapon so potent that the 34-year-old has been able to reach the pinnacle of the sport without having to develop a deep repertoire of combinations or perfect his technique.

A pawing jab followed by a right cross is elementary stuff, but that’s all it takes with Wilder on most nights. His right hand detonated on Dominic Breazeale in the first round of their fight in May, sending the 6’7″ colossus crumbling to the mat like a skyscraper mid-demolition. Wilder believes Ortiz won’t be able to survive much longer.

It’s a typical boast, but you get the sense Wilder is right; Ortiz does need to be perfect on Saturday. As a southpaw, Ortiz has to be careful about opening up lanes for the orthodox Wilder to send his right hand. His defense has to be impeccable while he looks to score points and go for the KO himself.

“This is not going 12 rounds,” Ortiz told Rafael through an interpreter. “Either he knocks me out or I knock him out, and I wish there was no bell between rounds so we could just keep going.”

Bermane Stiverne and Fury are the only two boxers to go a full 12 frames with Wilder. Fury managed to avoid Wilder’s payoff punch until the last round, and a miraculous recovery from the knockdown allowed him to salvage a draw. Ortiz is much older and not nearly as slick defensively as Fury. It’s unlikely he can avoid punishment for a full 36 minutes.

According to CBS Sports’ Brian Campbell, Ortiz blames his loss to Wilder on bad cardio, which left him unable to finish the job when he had Wilder dazed in the seventh round. Campbell has noted Ortiz is now cutting a slimmer figure, hoping better stamina can propel him to victory this time around. However, being in better shape won’t mean much if old age has quietly eroded his sharpness and reflexes. Every second Ortiz is in range of Wilder’s right hands means he’s in mortal danger, and a single mistake could land him in the hospital.

Ortiz has won three fights since losing to Wilder, the most recent a 12-round, unanimous decision over Christian Hammer in March. He’s done everything he can to set up a last shot at championship glory. Wilder is boxing’s most dangerous puncher, and he has plenty riding on this match. Ortiz may have learned his lesson from the first fight, but if Wilder has answered his own riddles in the interim, he should be able to reach a similar outcome on Saturday.

Luis Ortiz vs Deontay Wilder

Deontay Wilder vs Luis Ortiz 2 Fight Odds, Time, Date, Live Stream and TV InfoDeontay Wilder and Tyson Fury have been on a collision course ever since their thrilling first fight ended in a draw in December 2018. The heavyweights decided to each take two interim fights ahead of their rematch, reportedly penciled in for Feb. 22.

Click Hare To Watch Now Live

While Fury played it safe by lining up Tom Schwarz and Otto Wallin (the latter turned out to be more difficult than anyone imagined), Wilder (41-0-1, 40 KOs) is taking a significant risk with a rematch against Luis Ortiz (31-1, 26 KOs) on Saturday in Las Vegas.

In their first bout back in March 2018, Ortiz came achingly close to stopping Wilder in a furious seventh round at the Barclay’s Center in New York. The big Cuban was unable to close the deal, and Wilder bounced back by knocking out Ortiz with a vicious uppercut in the 10th frame.

Wilder must be confident he has Ortiz, a top-10 heavyweight, all figured out, because he’s risking losing his WBC world title three months before a megafight with Fury, considered by many to be the division’s lineal champion. A loss would greatly dampen the enthusiasm for that bout and might force promoters to reschedule it so Wilder can try to get his belt back.

Deontay Wilder vs Luis Ortiz 2 Live Stream Free Signup

Ortiz, 40, should be laser-focused for this fight. It likely represents his last chance to make history by becoming the first Cuban to win a heavyweight world title.

Saturday’s pay-per-view card also features Leo Santa Cruz taking on Miguel Flores for the vacant WBA super featherweight world title. Santa Cruz has long dominated the featherweight ranks and will now be making his debut at 130 pounds.

There are plenty of reasons to expect Saturday’s fight won’t last a full 12 rounds. For one, both fighters insist they are going to end the night early. Wilder, well aware of how close he came to defeat in the first fight, seems intent on finishing off Ortiz as quickly as possible.

“He has to be perfect for 12 rounds. I only have to be perfect for two seconds and—bam, baby, good night,” he said, per ESPN.com’s Dan Rafael.

Wilder’s right hand is the most lethal in the sport, a weapon so potent that the 34-year-old has been able to reach the pinnacle of the sport without having to develop a deep repertoire of combinations or perfect his technique.

A pawing jab followed by a right cross is elementary stuff, but that’s all it takes with Wilder on most nights. His right hand detonated on Dominic Breazeale in the first round of their fight in May, sending the 6’7″ colossus crumbling to the mat like a skyscraper mid-demolition. Wilder believes Ortiz won’t be able to survive much longer.

It’s a typical boast, but you get the sense Wilder is right; Ortiz does need to be perfect on Saturday. As a southpaw, Ortiz has to be careful about opening up lanes for the orthodox Wilder to send his right hand. His defense has to be impeccable while he looks to score points and go for the KO himself.

“This is not going 12 rounds,” Ortiz told Rafael through an interpreter. “Either he knocks me out or I knock him out, and I wish there was no bell between rounds so we could just keep going.”

Bermane Stiverne and Fury are the only two boxers to go a full 12 frames with Wilder. Fury managed to avoid Wilder’s payoff punch until the last round, and a miraculous recovery from the knockdown allowed him to salvage a draw. Ortiz is much older and not nearly as slick defensively as Fury. It’s unlikely he can avoid punishment for a full 36 minutes.

According to CBS Sports’ Brian Campbell, Ortiz blames his loss to Wilder on bad cardio, which left him unable to finish the job when he had Wilder dazed in the seventh round. Campbell has noted Ortiz is now cutting a slimmer figure, hoping better stamina can propel him to victory this time around. However, being in better shape won’t mean much if old age has quietly eroded his sharpness and reflexes. Every second Ortiz is in range of Wilder’s right hands means he’s in mortal danger, and a single mistake could land him in the hospital.

Ortiz has won three fights since losing to Wilder, the most recent a 12-round, unanimous decision over Christian Hammer in March. He’s done everything he can to set up a last shot at championship glory. Wilder is boxing’s most dangerous puncher, and he has plenty riding on this match. Ortiz may have learned his lesson from the first fight, but if Wilder has answered his own riddles in the interim, he should be able to reach a similar outcome on Saturday.

Deontay Wilder vs Luis Ortiz

Ryder vs Smith

They fought for the WBO belt live on ITV, a brutal endgame watched by over 17 million people. As the urgent rush to save Watson’s life gripped a nation, the British boxing love affair with the super middleweight division was secured. It has never diminished as year after year the men of 12-stone have set impossibly high standards and left behind unforgettable fights.

Eubank was beaten by Joe Calzaghe in 1997, Calzaghe held versions of the title until 2007, Carl Froch took over between 2008 and 2014 and in other years, often overlapping in classics, Nigel Benn, Robin Reid, Richie Woodall, Glenn Catley, James DeGale and George Groves all held a world super middleweight championship belt.

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It is one of British boxing’s finest lists, so many men and so many bitter rivalries that have followed many through time: the conflict between Benn and Eubank is still unresolved and the Froch and Groves fights have a sense that they will linger forever. It is boxing’s most enviable club to be in.

In September 2018 in a fight that is often forgotten, Groves, the defending champion, was broken and dumped in seven awful rounds at an outpost in Saudi Arabia by Liverpool’s Callum Smith, who was the slight underdog with the bookies.

This Saturday, in his second defence, Smith defends his WBA title against London’s John Ryder at the Echo Arena in Liverpool; Smith is considered the best fighter at his weight in the world right now, surrounded by British rivals Chris Eubank Jr and the current WBO super middleweight champion, Billy Joe Saunders. There is a fantasy plan to put Saunders and Smith together next year at Anfield, which cast a shadow over Smith’s childhood home.

That “dream fight” is on hold until Ryder, a legitimate challenger for Smith’s delayed homecoming, is beaten. Eubank Jr, seemingly guided by voices and his father, lost a tight decision in 2014 to Saunders, was beaten by Groves and would add an irresistible edge if he could be persuaded to be part of a trio with Smith and Saunders.

There is a welcome suggestion in the trade that 2020 will be about enormous domestic fights and fights like that always create other far more important fights.

© Provided by Independent Digital News & Media Limited Callum Smith celebrates his victory over Hassan N’Dam (Reuters)

However, the British trio have all been linked with Canelo Alvarez, Gennady Golovkin and other established names from boxing’s roll call of big earners. A fight against either would and should be worth about $10 million when all the tiny details, sums and extras have been nimbly calculated; Alvarez makes a guaranteed $33 million dollars each time he fights.

There are two other fighters, unbeaten and impressive and unknown young Americans, holding the IBF and WBC belts (Caleb Plant and David Benavidez), but they fight largely anonymously and would probably be considered too big a risk for too little gain – hey, nobody said the business of boxing was fair.

Smith is keeping the tradition alive, having a hard defence against a British fighter and looking at the crazy offers as they mount on his breakfast bar. Smith is 29 and a young 29, which means that he will be at this level or higher for three or more years. The Groves win was an ideal start, but his dance partners next year will define his position on that list of great British super-middles. Will he join Eubank and Benn at Old Trafford, the night at Wembley Stadium with Groves and Froch or any of the other memorable nights with 20,000 hanging off the ceiling at the Manchester Arena or The O2. He certainly has the invite from the club.

Smith vs Ryder

They fought for the WBO belt live on ITV, a brutal endgame watched by over 17 million people. As the urgent rush to save Watson’s life gripped a nation, the British boxing love affair with the super middleweight division was secured. It has never diminished as year after year the men of 12-stone have set impossibly high standards and left behind unforgettable fights.

Eubank was beaten by Joe Calzaghe in 1997, Calzaghe held versions of the title until 2007, Carl Froch took over between 2008 and 2014 and in other years, often overlapping in classics, Nigel Benn, Robin Reid, Richie Woodall, Glenn Catley, James DeGale and George Groves all held a world super middleweight championship belt.

It is one of British boxing’s finest lists, so many men and so many bitter rivalries that have followed many through time: the conflict between Benn and Eubank is still unresolved and the Froch and Groves fights have a sense that they will linger forever. It is boxing’s most enviable club to be in.

Smith vs Ryder Live Stream Free Signup

In September 2018 in a fight that is often forgotten, Groves, the defending champion, was broken and dumped in seven awful rounds at an outpost in Saudi Arabia by Liverpool’s Callum Smith, who was the slight underdog with the bookies.

This Saturday, in his second defence, Smith defends his WBA title against London’s John Ryder at the Echo Arena in Liverpool; Smith is considered the best fighter at his weight in the world right now, surrounded by British rivals Chris Eubank Jr and the current WBO super middleweight champion, Billy Joe Saunders. There is a fantasy plan to put Saunders and Smith together next year at Anfield, which cast a shadow over Smith’s childhood home.

That “dream fight” is on hold until Ryder, a legitimate challenger for Smith’s delayed homecoming, is beaten. Eubank Jr, seemingly guided by voices and his father, lost a tight decision in 2014 to Saunders, was beaten by Groves and would add an irresistible edge if he could be persuaded to be part of a trio with Smith and Saunders.

There is a welcome suggestion in the trade that 2020 will be about enormous domestic fights and fights like that always create other far more important fights.

© Provided by Independent Digital News & Media Limited Callum Smith celebrates his victory over Hassan N’Dam (Reuters)

However, the British trio have all been linked with Canelo Alvarez, Gennady Golovkin and other established names from boxing’s roll call of big earners. A fight against either would and should be worth about $10 million when all the tiny details, sums and extras have been nimbly calculated; Alvarez makes a guaranteed $33 million dollars each time he fights.

There are two other fighters, unbeaten and impressive and unknown young Americans, holding the IBF and WBC belts (Caleb Plant and David Benavidez), but they fight largely anonymously and would probably be considered too big a risk for too little gain – hey, nobody said the business of boxing was fair.

Smith is keeping the tradition alive, having a hard defence against a British fighter and looking at the crazy offers as they mount on his breakfast bar. Smith is 29 and a young 29, which means that he will be at this level or higher for three or more years. The Groves win was an ideal start, but his dance partners next year will define his position on that list of great British super-middles. Will he join Eubank and Benn at Old Trafford, the night at Wembley Stadium with Groves and Froch or any of the other memorable nights with 20,000 hanging off the ceiling at the Manchester Arena or The O2. He certainly has the invite from the club.